Revisiting Submarine Mass Movements along the U.S Atlantic Continental Margin: Implications for Tsunami Hazards

Event Location: 
BCCMWS Room 100
Event Date: 
Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
SCMSS Seminar Series

Presenter: Karsen Schottleutner

A peaked interest in the generation of tsunamis by submarine mass movements has created the need for a better understanding of submarine landslides, specifically offshore of the eastern U.S. Through the acquisition and analysis of bathymetric data, GLORIA sidescan sonar data, seismic reflection profiles data, and core data Chaytor el al. was able to better define the extent and thickness of individual and composite submarine landslides along the continental slope and rise. They observed the morphology of deposits in order to identifying types of landslides in this region. Failures seem to originate on either the open-slope or in submarine canyons in the eastern U.S. region. Slope-sourced failures prove to be larger than canyon sourced failures, suggesting they have a larger potential to create tsunamis. This research discusses the material volume disturbance that occurs during individual failure events along with composite failure events. By understanding the underlying geology this research was able to better understand the potential of the submarine landslides to initiate tsunamis along the U.S. Atlantic margin.

Andrews B, Brink T, Buczkowski B, Claytor J, Twichell D (2007) Revisiting Submarine Mass Movements along the U.S Atlantic Continental Margin: Implications for Tsunami Hazards. Springer: 395-403.