Students Embark on Intensive Study Trip to DC

A group of students recently embarked on a Washington, DC intensive study led by SCMSS Research Professor Thoman Mullikin.  The intensive study introduced students to the inner working of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government through meetings with key officials in our nation’s capital. This experiential learning environment helped the students develop a firsthand understanding of the application of sound science in complex statutory, legal, and regulatory matters.

U.S. Navy’s Coupled Mesoscale Modeling in Support of Atmospheric Refraction and Electromagnetic Propagation Prediction

Abstract

Over the last two decades advancements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and the increase in spatial resolutions due to computational resources and massive parallel processing, have made possible high fidelity characterization of vertical gradients in the lower atmosphere that form the surface and boundary layer. This detail has resulted in mesoscale modeling of atmospheric refractive properties which depend upon pressure, temperature and water vapor pressure. The refractive index is most sensitive to the vertical distributions with the ‘wet’ term (water vapor pressure) roughly four times larger than the ‘dry’ term (temperature).

In this presentation, the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) is investigated with field data from several coastal and littoral measurement campaigns to determine real-time operational modeling and predictive capability of atmospheric refractivity. Analysis of COAMPS surface and boundary layer gradients denote regions where important refractive effects cause ‘anomalous propagation ‘ of radio frequency (RF) signals. These RF signals, from radars or communications for example, can propagate far beyond the horizon in ducting conditions associated with negative gradients in ‘modified’ refractivity, or alternatively they may be strongly attenuated in sub-refractive conditions associated with strong positive gradients, whereby targets well within line-of-site are not sensed by the radar. Research strategies at the Naval Research Lab aim to improve both the mesoscale modeling of the local environment and how the simulated environment is used in electromagnetic RF propagation models to gain a better understanding of sensor performance during Naval operations.

Speaker Information

Tracy Haack is a scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, California.

More information about him and his work can be found here.

Using Remote Sensing to Monitor Buoyant Coastal Plumes

Abstract

Buoyant coastal plumes are discharges of fresh or brackish water from rivers and estuaries, and have important impacts on the physical and biological dynamics of the coastal ocean. The density of this water is less than that of the surrounding coastal water, and, due to the Coriolis Effect, these plumes typically turn right in the Northern Hemisphere and travel downshelf. Upwelling favorable winds may distrupt this process, however, and casue the plume to spread across the shelf. Satellite remote sensing can be used to determine the spatial characterisitics and evolution of these plumes under a variety of forcings. This talk will focus on the development of those plumes and the remote sensing methods used to monitor them, using the Winyah Bay plume as an example.

Speaker Information

Dr. Louis Keiner is an Associate Professor at Coastal Carolina University in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Physics as well as in the Department of Marine Science. He received his Ph.D. in Marine Studies from the University of Delware in 1997.

More information about him and his work can be found here.

CCU scientists honored for flood relief

A team of scientists at Coastal Carolina University recently received the Swamp Fox “Patriot Award” for exceptional service during a state natural disaster from the South Carolina State Guard for their contribution to flood relief efforts.

What Can CCU Cyberinfrastructure (CI) Do for You?

Abstract

The Coastal Carolina University Cyberinfrastructure Project, or CI Project, is rapidly becoming the centralized research computing system for the university. The CI Project provides facilities for data storage, High Performance Computing (HPC), application licensing, software development, and related activities. Ultimately, the CI Project provides resources for 21st century research and education activities at CCU, while facilitating information sharing and collaboration with colleagues worldwide.

In this presentation, I will give a brief history of the CI Project, discuss its capabilities, and explain how services can be obtained for both CCU users and collaborating external scientists. Topics will include HPC resources (cluster computing) for running simulations, storage capabilities for maintaining agency-required research data sets, and the cloud computing model used to access the system.

Speaker Information

Dr. Mike Murphy is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems at Coastal Carolina University. He earned his B.S. in Computer Science from the Clemson University Calhoun Honors College in 2005, where he graduated summa cum laude. After a brief period of study at Syracuse University, Dr. Murphy returned to Clemson University, where he received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in 2007. He completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science in May 2010, then joined the CCU faculty in August 2010.

More information about him and his work can be found here

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