Current and Emerging Resiliency Efforts of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium (and other Assorted notions)

Abstract

The coast is an ever-changing environment being continuously shaped by both variations in natural processes and the effects of human activities.  Understanding these changes and developing strategies to prepare for and respond to them is the focus of resiliency efforts in South Carolina and throughout the nation.  Resiliency is defined as "the ability to prepare and plan for, absorb, recover from, and more successfully adapt to adverse events" (National Academy of Sciences, 2012).  The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium is supporting coastal resiliency work in a broader context, with emphasis on environmental, economic, and social issues and opportunities, through several new initiatives and realigned programs.  For instance, the Consortium (1) joined with the NC, GA, and FL Sea Grant programs to support a regional research initiative focused on coastal community resilience; (2) expanded its extension program efforts in coastal community resiliency; (3) initiated a S.C. Stormwater Pond Research and Management Collaborative; (4) established a pilot program of Faculty-Student-Extension Specialist Study Groups to tackle short-term applied research and management issues in climate resiliency, community development, fisheries, and coastal ecosystems; and (5) initiated an agency “visioning” process to ensure that the Consortium is well-positioned to be relevant and resilient for the next 20-30 years.  Finally, to continue support for a highly trained and resilient workforce, the Consortium manages four graduate student fellowship opportunities: the John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship, NOAA Fisheries/Sea Grant Fellowship Program, the NOAA Coastal Management Fellowship, and the Kathryn D. Sullivan Earth and Marine Science Fellowship, and may pilot a Sea Grant Resiliency Research Graduate Fellowship effort.

Speaker Information

Rick DeVoe is the Excutive Director of the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium in Charleston, South Carolina. His research interests include coastal and marine resource policy, ocean observing, and science communication and education.

More information about him and his work can be found here

Building on Environmental Activism to Restore Intertidal Oyster Habitat and Conduct Ecological Research

Abstract

Recognition of a worldwide decline in oyster populations has resulted in increased efforts by environmentalists to enhance or restore oyster reef habitat. Although environmental activism may be seen as controversial and may not rely exclusively on established science, efforts to restore oyster reefs offer an ideal opportunity to conduct ecological research into the dynamics and importance of reef systems. The Coastal Oyster Recycling and Restoration Initiative (CORRI) was established to empower local environmentalists to advance oyster reef restoration efforts along the northern South Carolina coastline. CORRI-created reefs are the basis of varied research projects investigating reef restoration successes and coastal ecosystem services provided by both natural and restored reefs. Juvenile oyster (spat) recruitment, reef population growth, habitat complexity effects on predator-prey dynamics, and factors influencing bivalve filtration all were investigated. Environmentalist’s participation in CORRI facilitated establishment of rigorous, ecological studies on local reef systems. The future challenge is to continue to harness effectively environmental activism and enable natural synergies between the activist ethic and ecological research to develop to the benefit of both the environment and science.

Speaker Information

Dr. Keith Walters is a Full Professor in Marine Biology at Coastal Carolina University in the Department of Marine Science. He received his Ph.D. from the University of South Florida in 1987.

More information about him and his work can be found here

White Point Swash Webcam

Singleton Swash Webcam

Apache Pier

Includes sensors located 1 m below the sea surface and 1 m above the sea floor to measure temperature, salinity and O2 levels every 15 minutes.   Additional sensors monitor turbidity, pH, and chlorophyll levels.  Also a meteorology station mounted 15 feet above the pier deck collects wind, barometric pressure, temperature, and precipitation data.

Cherry Grove Pier

Includes sensors located 1 m below the sea surface and 1 m above the sea floor to measure temperature, salinity and O2 levels every 15 minutes.   Additional sensors monitor turbidity, pH, and chlorophyll levels.  Also a meteorology station mounted 15 feet above the pier deck collects wind, barometric pressure, temperature, and precipitation data.

2nd Ave Pier

Includes sensors located 1 m below the sea surface and 1 m above the sea floor to measure temperature, salinity and O2 levels every 15 minutes.   Additional sensors monitor turbidity, pH, and chlorophyll levels.  Also a meteorology station mounted 15 feet above the pier deck collects wind, barometric pressure, temperature, and precipitation data.

North Myrtle Beach Buoy

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