BCCMWS SODAR

Vaisala's Triton® Wind Profiler is an advanced remote sensing system that provides accurate wind measurement data across the entire blade sweep of today's largest wind turbines.

Factors affecting prey collection by a local “charismatic” species, the Venus flytrap

Abstract

Prey catching by the carnivorous Venus flytrap has long stimulated great interest among both scientists and the general public. Charles Darwin even studied prey capture using flytraps sent to him from North Carolina, and hypothesized that flytraps are selected to collect large prey. I will present research conducted by CCU students and faculty about prey collection by local populations of the Venus flytrap. Our research has investigated Venus flytrap diet composition (do they actually eat flies?), whether they mostly collect large prey as Darwin suggested, whether prey collection should be considered when restoring flytrap populations, and how they function as predators.

Speaker Information

Dr. John Hutchens is a Full Professor in Ecology at Coastal Carolina University in the Department of Biology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Georgia in 2000. 

More information about him and his work can be found here.

Sea Level Rise Modifies Halocarbon Production in Low-Lying Coastal Wetlands in Southeastern U.S.

Abstract

The relatively flat southeastern US coastal plain, from North Carolina to Texas, is particularly susceptible to sea level rise. As sea level rises, the boundary between the low-lying coastal freshwater forest and high marsh moves upslope.  Highly productive forested wetlands are replaced successively by degraded wetlands and eventually by coastal salt marsh. Not only does saltwater intrusion change vegetation composition, high chloride and bromide levels can interact with the large pool of soil organic matter through halogenation processes that are still poorly understood. Halogens have historically been treated as inert elements in natural humification processes.  However, numerous recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine and bromine are active components in C cycles. Furthermore, these halogenation processes are important to elucidate as they produce volatile halocarbons that act as ozone-depleting compounds in the atmosphere. Halogenation of organic matter may also affect the decomposition rates of organic matter.  The overall goal of this research is to assess novel decomposition process routes of terrestrial organic matter in forested wetlands with high levels of chloride and bromide.

Speaker Information

Dr. Alex Chow is an Associate Professor in Biogeochemistry and Environmental Quality at Clemson University's School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences. He obtained his Ph.D. in Hydrologic Science from the University of California at Davis in 2000.

More information about him and his work can be found here.

Fate of the Fines: the behavior and value of mud supplied to the ocean

Abstract

River-supplied fine-grained sediments enter the coastal zone and the ocean mainly in suspension. Once these muds settle, they form major sinks for nutrients and contaminants, and serve as a cradle for benthic life. Toward permanent deposition, various environmental forcing mechanisms as well as human activities are responsible for frequent major disturbances in terms of distribution, mobilization, and retention. Even after final deposition, they remain an active component of the substrate, for instance by compaction processes. The resulting deposits thus record the history of environmental changes in exceptional sensitivity and remarkably high resolution. 

In this talk, I shall provide a tour through a variety of river deltas and mud depocenters on the continental shelf to illustrate how we can extract and read the effects of the individual environmental drivers from the sedimentary record. Following an overview on the major processes that control mud behavior, changes in sea level and continental runoff, and the role of various oceanographic/hydrodynamic components are discussed. In addition, we look at the human impact through deforestation, damming and embankment as well as offshore dredging and trawling.

Speaker Information

Dr. Till Hanebuth is an Associate Professor in the School of Coastal and Marine Systems Science at Coastal Carolina University. He received his Ph.D. in Geology-Paleontology from the Christian-Albrechts University in Kiel in 2000.

More information about him and his work can be found here

Environmental Physiology of Reptiles: Current Research and Future Directions

Abstract

The biological discipline of environmental animal physiology seeks to understand how animals respond physiologically to changes in their environment as well as how physiological characteristics influence animal abundance and distribution across the landscape. Research in my lab focuses broadly on environmental physiology of reptiles, especially reproductive physiology of lizards, snakes, and turtles. Reptiles are excellent subjects for studies in environmental physiology because they exist in a wide range of environments and often flourish in extremely harsh conditions (e.g. heat, dryness, salinity), which would pose physiological challenges to many other types of animals. The three focal areas of research currently being pursued in my lab are 1) interactive effects of temperature and oxygen on embryonic developmental processes, 2) ecology and reproductive biology of diamondback terrapin, and 3) spatial ecology and habitat use of copperhead snakes.

Speaker Information

Dr. Scott Parker is an Associate Professor in Biology at Coastal Carolina University. He received his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2006

More information about him and his work can be found here

Graduate Students Discuss Plastic Microbead Ban

Shown below are members of our Graduate Environmental Policy class meeting last month with Congressman Pallone's Legislative Director Tuley Wright to discuss the plastic micro-bead ban legislation.   Samantha Ladewig led the discussion on technical issues and related research to the micro-bead legislation.  Congratulations to Sam on her tremendous work on this subject and her public lecture on the significance of product awareness.

CCU Scientists are leading the way in developing good policy with good science!

Backscatter Intensity (1m) - vicinity of Stono Inlet

This dataset shows 1m backscatter intensity imagery for the vicinity of Stono Inlet, South Carolina. The Zip archive contains a GeoTIFF.

Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model (3ft) - vicinity of Stono Inlet

This dataset shows a 3ft Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for the vicinity of Stono Inlet, South Carolina. The Zip archive contains an ESRI Grid.

Pages

Subscribe to School of the Coastal Environment Web Portal RSS